REVIEW: Afterlife (Book 3) – Dee Shulman

afterlifeAfterlife*

Dee Shulman

Book 3

Paperback, 427 pages

Published April 3rd 2014 by Penguin

ISBN: 978-0-141-34028-9

Rating:
– 3.0 stars

“Eva is on the brink of death. Ripped from her own world she’s woken in another, only to discover the devastating truth about the lethal fever she’s been fighting – and the enemy that’s chased her and Seth through time. Now the reckless twenty-first century girl and the fearless Roman gladiator must face the final battle. But it’s not just their love at stake; the fate of the universe is in their hands.”


This book is the grand finale in the Parallon trilogy by Dee Shulman. And again continues from the cliff-hanger ending of book two Delirium. My review for book two can be found here and if you haven’t read these books and want to read my review about book one, click here. The book begins with Eva waking up in the new, strange world that is Parallon and Seth trying to reach her before the sinister Cassius. When the pair are united, they are reunited with some old friends and some old enemies and must work together to not only defeat Cassius, but also must stop the vortex turning into a black hole that would destroy not only Parallon but earth and all its inhabitants too.


This book was definitely a lot better than the previous and I was definitely glad I continued with this series and picked this book up. It hang a lot more action, was a lot faster paced and just flowed a lot better. I still had some qualms with this book and the series in general, but it was still a significant improvement from the last two books, which made me extremely happy. My main trouble with the book was the writing style that becomes more predominately annoying as the books progress. The context and terms in the book are very complex are very complicated and are barely explain. This very much juxtaposes to the surrounding sentences as they are basic and very underdeveloped; missing linguistic techniques, portrayal of emotion through complex sentences and also major lack of description of the surrounds and terminology used in the book.


The characters in this book were also of higher quality in this book too. Although they still remained slightly underdeveloped, I felt more of a connection to them and cared a degree more over what happened to them. I also really wanted a “happily ever after” for Seth and Eva too, which I always deem as a good thing. Now that Eva’s fever is gone, I felt that she concentrated more on straightening her life out. She also didn’t faint every few pages, which was brilliant. Unfortunately, we also had the typical “if you’re going to fight I’m coming with you…” and, of course the “how can you expect me to watch you going off to fight?…” blah, blah, blah. We all know how it goes, I’m sure. Additionally, Seth was still going all out on his Edward-Cullen-protection-of-girlfriend programme. It was a little eye roll worthy. Ok, very eye roll worthy at times. I was sad to loss a couple of side characters, but unfortunately the writing style didn’t convey a lot of emotion, so I wasn’t distraught over it, regrettably.


To summarise, this book was definitely a worthy read even if it wasn’t wholly satisfying, as I still had important questions after the book had concluded that I felt were important and felt unhappy that they were left unanswered. The series overall was mediocre and I don’t think I would recommend it to fellow YA readers, but I think children who are just being introduced to YA might want to read it as it is a slight delve into the void of science-fiction. I am glad that I made myself read the final book but am pleased that I have no more books from this trilogy to read.


Please like and comment below if you have read this trilogy, you want to buy this book but need more persuading or if you agreed/disagreed with my review. I’d love to hear from you! Or you can contact me here.


* This book was sent to me by a publisher in return for an honest review.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s